Monday, May 22, 2017

Mousse, A LCHF / Ketogenic Dessert



Everybody needs a little dessert sometime right? I mean there are hundreds of recipes for low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) and ketogenic (Keto) “fat bombs” and other sweets on the world wide web and in many LCHF/Keto cookbooks. Granted some taste better then others, and some are really not that great. Since I started the LCHF/Keto way of eating (WOE), I am not a big proponent of these “fat bombs” or dietary sweets. I think you are better off eating regular nutritious LCHF/Keto foods, which is a pretty big statement from a guy who has been a pastry chef and has an Associates of Applied Sciences degree in Baking and Pastry, but there you have it priorities and opinions change over time.

Having said all of that, even I like a good “sweet” every now and again. My wife, who is a lover of sweets, brought me a recipe that she had found for a ketogenic mousse on the internet and asked “what do you think of this?” Now, I do not remember where the original recipe came from, but I told her that I think I could work with it to make us a good LCHF/Keto dessert recipe that has a moderate to high amount of fat, with a minimal amount of carbohydrates per serving. When broken down and analyzed, the base recipe used to make the mousse recipes in this article contains 87.5% fat, 6% protein, and only 6.5% carbohydrates, making it a definite LCHF/Keto style dessert.

Mousse Base Recipe (Yield: 6, 1/3 cup servings, or 8, ¼ cup servings)

8 ounces of cream cheese
1 cup heavy whipping cream
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
9 - 12 drops liquid sucralose

Total Recipe
Calories – 1627, protein 17 grams, fat 168 grams, carbohydrates 22.85 grams

Per 1/3 Cup Serving
Calories – 271, protein 2.83 grams, fat 28 grams, carbohydrates 3.8 grams

Per 1/4 Cup Serving
Calories – 203, protein 2.12 grams, fat 21 grams, carbohydrates 2.85 grams

Remove cream cheese from the refrigerator and allow to soften and come to room temperature. Then add vanilla extract and sweetener of choice and blend with a hand mixer until well combined.

Next add the flavorings of your choice per the instructions below and mix once again until all of the ingredients are throughly combined. Then add the heavy whipping cream and beat until thickened to your liking. Then place in containers and store in the fridge and allow to chill.

Chef's Note: We use small 4 ounce glass canning jelly jars for our mousse, but any small conatiners will work. We simply have a lot of these jars and they are just the right size for this recipe, and you can buy plastic screw on lids to fit this jars at Walmart for about $2.00 for six lids.


Chocolate Mousse

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder

Total Recipe
Calories – 1642, protein 18 grams, fat 168.5 grams, carbohydrates 24.85 grams

Per 1/3 Cup Serving
Calories – 273, protein 3 grams, fat 28 grams, carbohydrates 3.10 grams

Per 1/4 Cup Serving
Calories – 205, protein 2.25 grams, fat 21 grams, carbohydrates 2.85 grams


Chocolate Peanut Butter Mousse

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tablespoon PBfit Peanut butter powder

Total Recipe
Calories – 1667, protein 17 grams, fat 169.25 grams, carbohydrates 25.85 grams

Per 1/3 Cup Serving
Calories – 277, protein 2.83 grams, fat 28.2 grams, carbohydrates 4.3 grams

Per 1/4 Cup Serving
Calories – 208, protein 2.12 grams, fat 21.1 grams, carbohydrates 3.23 grams


Coconut Mousse

¼ cup unsweetened organic coconut
1 teaspoon coconut extract

Total Recipe
Calories – 1847, protein 17 grams, fat 188 grams, carbohydrates 22.85 grams

Per 1/3 Cup Serving
Calories – 307.8, protein 2.83 grams, fat 31.3 grams, carbohydrates 3.80 grams

Per 1/4 Cup Serving
Calories – 230.8, protein 2.12 grams, fat 23.5 grams, carbohydrates 2.85 grams

Chef's Note: We use the Great Value brand 'Organic Unsweetened Coconut Flakes' available at Walmart. According to the nutritional label, a 2 tablespoon serving contains 4 grams of carbohydrates, but has 4 grams of fiber, making the 'Net Carbs' equal zero. Therefore, the ¼ cup serving (4 tbsp's) would contain 8 grams of carbohydrates, bur has 8 grams of fiber so the 'Net Carbs' still equal zero.


French Vanilla Mousse

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Total Recipe
Calories – 1639, protein 17 grams, fat 168 grams, carbohydrates 23.35 grams

Per 1/3 Cup Serving
Calories – 273.1, protein 2.83 grams, fat 28 grams, carbohydrates 3.89 grams

Per 1/4 Cup Serving
Calories – 204.8, protein 2.12 grams, fat 21 grams, carbohydrates 2.91 grams


Peanut Butter Mousse

2 tablespoons PBfit Peanut butter powder

Total Recipe
Calories – 1677, protein 23 grams, fat 169.5 grams, carbohydrates 24.85 grams

Per 1/3 Cup Serving
Calories – 279.5, protein 3.83 grams, fat 28.25 grams, carbohydrates 4.14 grams

Per 1/4 Cup Serving
Calories – 209.6, protein 2.87 grams, fat 21.18 grams, carbohydrates 3.10 grams


Conclusion

This mousse can be thickened as much as you want simply but beating it longer with your hand or stand mixer. For a lighter texture process the mousse less, for a thicker more pudding like texture mix the mousse more. While I do have a Kitchen Aid stand mixer, I prefer to make this mousse with a cheap hand mixer which we purchased from Walmart for about $12.00. Why? Clean up is faster, and it only takes about 90 seconds to get the ingredients to the texture that we like in our mousse. And the reality is, the stand mixer is a little overkill for a quick dessert recipe of this size.

There are probably dozens of different variations on this mousse recipe that you could make by adding a variety of different extracts and flavorings, but these are our favorites. Even a little pureed fruit would be a nice touch, just don't forget to count the additional carbs when doing so. As always, we ask that if you have enjoyed this article, please share it with your friends. Don't forget to check out our Facebook page 'CulinaryYouLCHF' for more articles. And send us a friend request, or subscribe to the blog so that you are notified when new recipes become available. You can also find us on Google+ and on Pintrest.


Our Note Of Thanks: Many of you have expressed you prayers and thoughts for us after our home was damaged and eventually destroyed by the tornado that hit Canton, Texas on April 29th, 2017. We would like to take a momeet to say thank you to eveyone out there for your love and support. This is the first article that has been posted to the blog since this tramatic event. We are rebuilding and will be back on our property soon, but it may take a month or so before we get back to full steam regarding posting our favorite LCHF/Keto recipes. Once again, we would like to say thank you for your prayers, support, and words of encouragement.

Monday, April 24, 2017

Asian Inspired Vinaigrette



Vinaigrettes are a great way to not only add flavor but good fats to your salad. This Asian inspired soy sauce based dressing is an excellent substitute for other vinaigrette type dressings and is one that every LCHF / Ketogenic practitioner should have in their culinary toolbox. Quick and easy to make, you choose the type of oil you wish (olive, canola, avocado, walnut etc…) and whether or not you wish to use soy sauce or coconut aminos for that salty savory flavor.

So save yourself some money and carbohydrates and break into your pantry and put together this quick and simple sesame soy ginger vinaigrette. I guarantee you will love the flavor and it is only 0.34 carbohydrates per tablespoon, that's less than 1 carbohydrate for a 3 tablespoon serving, whereas the commercial prepared version contains 4.5 grams per tablespoon or 13.5 grams of carbohydrates per a 3 tablespoon serving. That's 13 times the carbohydrates!

Sesame Soy Ginger Vinaigrette (Yield: about 2 cups, 29 tablespoons)

¾ cup oil of choice
½ cup soy sauce or coconut amino's
¼ cup water
1/3 cup rice wine vinegar
3 drops liquid sucralose, or sweetener of your choice (equal to 3 tablespoons)
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon sesame seeds
½ – 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Total Recipe (soy sauce)
Calories – 1710, protein 12 grams, fat 183 grams, carbohydrates 10.07 grams

Per Tablespoon (soy sauce)
Calories – 59, protein 0.41 grams, fat 6.3 grams, carbohydrates 0.34 grams

Ming's Sesame Soy Ginger Vinaigrette (Per Tablespoon)
Calories – 18, protein 0 grams, fat 0 grams, carbohydrates 4.5 grams

Chef's Note: This dressing originally called for 3 tablespoons of honey, but we use liquid sucralose. Because of the concentration of the sucralose I only use 3 drops (equal to 1 tablespoon sweetener). Use the sweetener of your choice but adjust the sweetness as necessary to suit your personal preference. If you use 3 tablespoons of a substitute sweetener you may find it to sweet, so start out with less, and add a little at a time until you reach the desired sweetness. For more information about liquid sucralose, check out my article 'Liquid Sucralose: A Great LCHF Sweetener'. on our blog.


Coconut Amino's Versus Soy Sauce

Coconut amino's are pretty popular as a soy sauce substitute among the ketogenic community, and you can can substitute coconut amino's for the soy sauce if you wish. I have not tried them, so I am not sure exactly how they compare to taste with that of a traditional soy sauce. For the purpose of nutritional comparison, I used the information from the nutritional label of 'Coconut Secret' brand of coconut aminos' which have 3 carbohydrates per tablespoon (all from sugar).

Total Recipe Made with Coconut Amino's (about 2 cups, 29 tablespoons)
Calories – 1762, protein 0.78 grams, fat 182 grams, carbohydrates 28.57 grams

Per Tablespoon Made With Coconut Amino's
Calories – 61, protein 0.02 grams, fat 6.27 grams, carbohydrates 0.99 grams

While many LCHF / Ketogenic practitioners may use coconut aminos in place of soy sauce, it should be noted when looking at the nutritional value of this dressing, that the coconut aminos have three times the amount of carbohydrates (some are 3 – 15 carbs per tablespoon) . Nutritional values for coconut aminos seems to vary quite a bit depending on the brand, so be sure and check the label before purchasing. For more information regarding coconut amino's check out the article on our blog 'Soy Sauce Verses Coconut Amino's'.


Conclusion

As I have mentioned in many of my articles, we try and get all of our carbohydrates from green leafy vegetables and salads. When you eat a dinner or chef salad 4 – 5 times a week it is important to have a variety of different low carbohydrate high fat dressing options, and home made vinaigrettes fill this need nicely. As always, I hope that you have found this article informative and beneficial for you and your family, if so please take the time to share it with your friends so that they can benefit as well. Don't forget to follow us on our blog, check out our Facebook Page 'CulinaryYouLCHF' or add us to your circle Google+ for out latest ketogenic articles.


Similar Articles On Our Blog:









Resources:

Low Carb Grocery List, The Ketogenic Diet Resource, Accessed April 10, 2017.




Thursday, April 20, 2017

Soy Sauce Vs Coconut Aminos



There is a ton of information on the internet regarding foods you should avoid and foods that you can eat when pursing a LCHF / Ketogenic way of eating (WOE). There are many good blogs and websites regarding such sources, and then there are those which promote their own underlying agenda that tend the skew the information they provide regarding foods they consider to be LCHF or Ketogenic friendly. One of these foods which seems to fall into this category is soy sauce.

For example one blogger writes “Mainly for health reasons, avoid soy products apart from a few non-GMO fermented products which are known for their health benefits.” This statement says it all. This particular blogger does not have a problem with soy sauce or other fermented soy products as long as they are not genetically modified organisms (GMO's). So their basis for not wanting you to use soy products is not necessarily a scientific perspective, but one of personal choice. They do not like products containing GMO's, ergo, these products are not Ketogenic. This in of itself is false reasoning.

If you want to eat non-GMO foods that is a personal choice, and who knows, we might all be better off if we did so, but a food does not have to be non-GMO to be ketogenic. What a food does need to be is low in carbohydrates as eating foods high in carbohydrates (more than 60 grams per day) is what knocks your body out of ketosis. Whether the carbohydrate source is organic, non-organic, GMO or non-GMO doesn't matter, you body is unable to tell the difference. In today's article, we are going to look at both soy sauce and coconut aminos and compare and contrast these two somewhat controversial items. It is my hope that the information in this article helps you to make your own choice based on the facts, and not the rhetoric.


The Comparisons (Coconut Amino's Versus Soy Sauce)

Coconut amino's are pretty popular as a soy sauce substitute among the ketogenic community, and you can substitute coconut amino's for the soy sauce if you wish. The nutritional count for coconut amino's is about 1 – 2 carbohydrates per teaspoon (all from sugar). I have not tried them, so I am not sure exactly how they compare to taste with that of a traditional soy sauce. Coconut amino's should not however be confused with 'Braggs Liquid Amino's' which is made from vegetable protein and soy beans. I have a bottle of the 'Braggs Liquid Amino's' that a family member bought but did not like. To me, the Bragg's tastes like soy sauce, but that should not be surprising as it is made from soybeans (Btw, the 'Braggs' has zero carbohydrates).

There are two potential problems with using coconut amino's as a substitute for soy sauce. The first is the price, if you are on a budget, coconut amino's are going to cost you two to three times that of a traditional soy sauce. While prices vary, an 8 ounce bottle of coconut amino's will cost you somewhere between $3.50 - $10.00 via the internet, as opposed to a traditional soy sauce that will cost you $1.88 - $3.00 at your local supermarket, with organic soy sauce options costing you a little more. The Second, and larger issue is the carbohydrate count. From a purely Ketogenic stand point, coconut aminos are a worse choice as they are significantly higher in carbohydrates than traditional soy sauce options. The 'Dynamic Health' brand for example being the worse with a whopping 15 carbohydrates per tablespoon. I have listed the following soy sauce and coconut amino options not only by their category, but alphabetically so that you can compare not only the cost of the item, but it's overall carbohydrate count as well. Most adults need to keep their carbohydrate count less than 60 grams a day to maintain a state of ketosis, type 2 diabetics may need a stricter restriction of 20 carbohydrates or less per day. Therefore, using a high carbohydrate brand of coconut aminos could quickly derail your progress so care must be taken if and when you choose to use coconut aminos.



Conventional and 'Gluten Free' Soy Sauces

Great Value Soy Sauce 15oz bottle $1.88 (< 1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)
Kikkoman All-purpose Soy Sauce 15oz bottle $2.28 (1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)
Kikkoman All-purpose 'Gluten Free' Soy Sauce 15oz bottle $3.29 (1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)
Lee Kum Kee All-purpose Premium Soy Sauce 16.9oz bottle $3.04 (<1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)
San J 'Gluten Free' Soy Sauce 10oz bottle $2.59 (1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)


Some Organic Soy Sauces

Kikkoman Organic Soy Sauce 10oz bottle $4.39 (1 carbohydrates per tablespoon)
San J Organic Tamari Soy Sauce 20oz bottle $5.99 (< 1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)
Simple Truth Organic Soy Sauce 10oz bottle $2.99 (1 carbohydrate per tablespoon)


Organic Coconut Amino's

Big Tree Farms Organic Coconut Aminos 10oz bottle $5.95 (6 carbohydrates per tablespoon)
Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos 8oz bottle $4.99 (3 carbohydrates per tablespoon)
Dynamic Health Organic Coconut Aminos 8oz bottle $3.29 (15 carbohydrates per tablespoon)
Ojio Organic Coconut Aminos 10oz bottle $8.99 (3 carbohydrates per tablespoon)
Thrive Organic Coconut Aminos 10oz bottle $5.65 (6 carbohydrates per tablespoon)

What we see is that from a purely Ketogenic perspective, is that coconut aminos are a less desirable choice than that of traditional or organic soy sauce options. On average, coconut aminos contain three times the carbs, with a few brands containing 6 – 15 times more carbohydrates than soy sauce. So why are there so many keto advocates pushing for the use of coconut amino's in place of soy sauce? Well that's the million dollar question.


Sodium Comparisons

The one place where coconut amino's do shine is their low sodium content. Overall they tend to have about half of the sodium as their traditional soy sauce counterparts. The one surprising thing for me was that the organic soy sauces all had higher sodium levels than the traditional soy sauces. So if sodium is an issue in your diet, then you should probably avoid these products, or at the very least enjoy them in moderation. I have listed all the sauces in this article in alphabetical order regardless of the type for easy comparison.

Big Tree Farms Organic Coconut Aminos (480mg per tablespoon)
Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos (339mg sodium per tablespoon)
Dynamic Health Organic Coconut Aminos (75mg sodium per tablespoon)
Great Value All-purpose Soy Sauce (900mg sodium per tablespoon)
Ojio Organic Coconut Aminos (390mg sodium per tablespoon)
Kikkoman All-purpose Sauce (575mg sodium per tablespoon)
Kikkoman All-purpose 'Gluten Free' Soy Sauce (960mg sodium per tablespoon)
Kikkoman Organic All-purpose Sauce (1000mg sodium per tablespoon)
Lee Kum Kee All-purpose Premium Soy Sauce (1200mg sodium per tablespoon)
San J Organic Tamari Soy Sauce (940mg sodium per tablespoon)
San J 'Gluten Free' Soy Sauce (980mg sodium per tablespoon)
Simple Truth Organic Soy Sauce (980mg sodium per tablespoon)
Thrive Organic Coconut Aminos (480mg sodium)


The One Caveat (Gluten-Free Dietary Restrictions)

The one caveat to this whole article is this, if you are embracing a ketogenic diet because you have celiac's disease (are gluten intolerant) then you will probably need to stay away from soy sauce altogether as most if not all traditional soy sauces contain some wheat protein. If you choose to use soy sauce, make sure you read the label carefully. Even the organic soy sauces listed in this article contained wheat protein according to their nutritional labeling. I have listed two 'gluten free' soy sauce options for comparison in this article, I am sure there are probably more, but I have listed the more popular options that I could find.


Conclusion

So are coconut aminos a better option that soy sauce? From all the research that I have done, my personal opinion is “no”. Not only do they almost cost twice as much as traditional and 'gluten free' soy sauces, they contain 3 to 15 times more carbohydrates (depending on the brand) than traditional and 'gluten free' soy sauces. The high amount of carbohydrates per tablespoon in my opinion is the biggest problem with substituting coconut aminos for soy sauce. Heck, if you want non-GMO, then buy one of the certified non-GMO soy sauces listed in this article. They are still cheaper than the coconut amino options, and they have only 1 carbohydrate per tablespoon.

I will be honest with you, I only have one agenda when I write any of the articles on this blog, and that is to keep you informed to the best of my ability on how to be successful with your ketogenic diet. I am not sponsored by any brand, product, or company, I simply write about things that affect me, my family, and our ketogenic life. When I start to write an article for the blog, I try and do the best, most accurate research possible in my limited time and present you with the facts so that you can make an informed decision. Sometimes my facts and or conclusions ruffle some people feathers, but I attempt to present them in an unbiased way so that you may benefit from my research. As always, I hope that you have found this article informative and beneficial for you and your family, if so please take the time to share it with your friends so that they can benefit as well. Don't forget to follow us on our blog, check out our Facebook Page 'CulinaryYouLCHF' or add us to your circle Google+ for out latest ketogenic articles.


Resources:


Phinney, Stephen D., MD, Phd, and Volek, Phd, RD, The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Living (Beyond Obesity LLC, 2011).

Phinney, Stephen D., MD, Phd, and Volek, Phd, RD, The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Performance' (Beyond Obesity LLC, 2012).